Easiest 8000m Peak To Climb In Nepal

7 Apr 2024 Prakash Devkota

Easiest 8000m Peak To Climb In Nepal

Nepal, the charming nation nestled in the Himalayas, is a wonderland for mountaineering enthusiasts. This beautiful nation alone houses 8 of the highest peaks in the world out of 14 in the 8,000-meter class, which makes it the most popular destination for climbers who are looking forward to testing their skills on some of the most fascinating alpine peaks and for those who want to engrave their name in the history. However, starting the scaling adventures of these giant 8,000-meter peaks is not an easy feat; you will have to consider several challenging factors of the expedition, from the technical section and long climbing period to alpine temperatures and death zones.

If you are looking forward to building your Himalayan expedition in the 8,000-meter class, you should start with some easy-graded scaling prospects first. We have created a list of the easiest 8000m peak to climb in Nepal to slowly build up your climbing prospects to more advanced peaks in the class. Mt. Manaslu is considered the easiest 8000m peak to climb in Nepal out of all other peaks for an unforgettable climbing experience of the 8,000-meter giants. However, if you want to go beyond this incredible peak in the west-central Himalayas, here are other incredible climbing prospects in ascending order.

Easiest 8000m Peak to Climb in Nepal

Mt. Manaslu- 8,163 meters (26,781 feet)

Manaslu Expedition

Mt. Manaslu, the eighth highest peak among the 14 highest peaks in the world, is considered to be the easiest 8000m peak to climb in Nepal. This magnificent peak in the Mansiri Himal Range in the west-central part of the country has less technical sections and easy-grade slopes. Regardless, climbing the 8,000-meter class mountains, which have death zones, is not easy and is physically demanding. Manaslu Peak Expedition takes around 38 days, and you will have to make your way across four camps on the slopes, acclimatizing properly before pushing for the summit of the peak.

The Manaslu Advanced Camp is located at an altitude of 4,700 meters (15,419 feet), which is also called Lower Camp and Upper Camp. It is a steep path across the boulders to reach the crampon point and push toward Camp I, which is situated at an altitude of 5,800 meters (19,028 feet). The climbing route up ahead stretches across the ice wall slopes, the climbing part between Camp I and Camp II is considered to be the most challenging part of the Manaslu Peak Climbing. This section has several ice serac and crevasses; you will have to use the ladder to cross this part.

After reaching Camp II, which is at an elevation of 6,400 meters (20,997 feet), the distance between Camp II and Camp III at an altitude of 6,800 meters (22,310 feet) is considered a comparatively easy and safe climbing section. Still, you will have to climb a 150-200 meter high vertical ice slope to continue further in the climbing route. The trail to Camp IV at an elevation of 7,500 meters (24,606 feet) is also quite smooth, and there is about a 50-60 meter long flat area during the last part of the camps. From Camp IV, it is a flat trail until the vertical snow wall is about 40-50 meters high; then, you will scale the flat path of the mountain below the False Summit of Manaslu (8,090 meters). The path to the summit of the summit of Mt. Manaslu (8,163 meters) is also smooth and safe; you will push for the summit using the rope life for safety in case of heavy winds at the summit.

Mt. Lhotse- 8,516 meters (27,940 feet)

Which mountain should you climb first, Everest or Lhotse

Going in by order, Mt. Lhotse, which is the fourth-highest snow-clad peak on the planet, is considered another easiest 8000m peaks to climb in Nepal. This incredible Himalayan peak has three summits, out of which the Lhotse Main is the highest peak. Other summits of the mountain rise above the 8,000-meter class; Lhotse Shar is at an elevation of 8,383 meters (27,503 feet), and Lhotse Middle/East is at an altitude of 8,413 meters (27,601 feet). The Lhotse Advanced Camp is situated at an altitude of 5,364 meters (17,598 feet), and both the Lhotse Expedition and the Everest Expedition share the same base camp.

After acclimatizing properly at the base camp, you will push toward Camp I, situated at an altitude of 5,900 meters (19,357 feet), navigating your way across the rocks and Khumbu Icefall. The journey further ahead from Camp I to Camp II at an elevation of 6,400 meters (20,997 feet) is considered to be of moderate level, and you will have to cross a crevasse using a ladder. The route further ahead to Camp III at an altitude of 6,900 meters (22,638 feet) is steep, and this is also the fixed rope section, which helps you traverse across the ice and snow sections of the slope. Lhotse Camp IV, which is situated at 7,925 meters (25,984 feet), consists of steep sections and vertical snow walls heading toward the Yellow Band.

During the summit push to reach the top of the mountain, Mt. Lhotse (8,516 meters), you will have to ascend over a vertical snow wall about 40-50 meters high and tilting at 60°. As you ascend higher with the help of the fixed rope, it’s about a 50° vertical route to reach the summit of the peak.

Mt. Everest- 8,848 meters (29,032 feet)

Why Mountaineers Prefer Climbing Everest From The Southeast Ridge

Mt. Everest, the highest snow-clad peak on the planet, may seem like the hardest hurdle in the mountaineering world from the outside. People who are not familiar with the Himalayan expedition may consider this grand to be the hardest peak of them all to climb due to its summit elevation point that is said to touch the heavens. However, the Everest Expedition is not that strenuous or deadly despite its height; in fact, it is considered one of the easiest 8000m peaks to climb in Nepal due to its straightforward climbing route. However, due to its significant altitude, the death zone in this highest of the world is lengthy, so even though the climbing routes of this peak are not that strenuous, it is still a demanding expedition.

The Advanced Base Camp of Mt. Everest is situated at an altitude of 5,364 meters (17,598 feet); from the base camp, you will have to cross the Khumbu Icefall to reach Camp I, which is at an altitude of 6,065 meters (19,898 feet). The scaling trail up ahead from Camp I to Camp II is also challenging as you cross the Western CWM, which has some deep crevasses to reach the campsite located at 6,400 meters (20,997 feet). The climbing section from Camp II to Camp III, which is at an altitude of 7,162 meters (23,497 feet) is considered a challenging part of this expedition as you reach a significant altitude where you will need to use the supplement oxygen.

This climbing section also takes you across the steep slopes with the hard ice of the Lhotse Face. Then, journey to the South Col, where Camp IV rises at an elevation of 7,950 meters (26,082 feet) takes you across the trail covered with loose rock amidst the towering Everest on the north and Lhotse on the south. The final push to the summit of this highest peak on earth passed the Balcony and the Hillary Step to reach the central summit of the peak. You will use the fixed rope to climb the 40-foot rock climbing section of the Hillary Step on the way to the top of the world.

Mt. Cho Oyu- 8,188 meters (26,864 feet)

Cho Oyu

Going by the ranking, Mt. Cho Oyu is another incredible yet easiest 8000m peak to climb in Nepal. The main factors that make the Cho Oyu expedition an easy-grade scaling adventure are the easily manageable technical difficulty of the expedition and the camping as well as climbing routes that are less susceptible to the risks of avalanches. The expedition success rate of this magnificent peak in the 8,000-meter class is likely higher. Cho Oyu Advanced Base Camp is situated at an altitude of 5,700 meters (18,7000 feet), which is the second-highest base camp among the 8,000-meter class peaks just behind the Everest Advanced Base Camp in the north climbing route.

A proper acclimatization at the base camp will follow the climb across the rock-strewn and steep sections of the mountain as you head toward Camp I, situated at an altitude of 6,400 meters (20,997 feet). Then, moving further ahead, you will scale on the 30°-35° slope to reach the Hanging Point, a vertical ice wall that you will overcome using a fixed rope. After climbing the ice wall, its flat slope trails toward Camp II at an elevation of 7,000 meters (23,000 feet). The scaling route up ahead is safe and easy. The snow slope is about 20° vertical, and you will climb across some 50° -55° slope wall to reach Camp III at an altitude of 7,450 meters (24,442 feet) which is situated just beneath the Yellow Band.

The last stretch of this magnificent peak in the Himalayas takes you across the Yellow Band, either from the northeast or northwest route. After climbing across the 50° -55°, you will reach the flat surface about 900 meters in distance on the 10° slope to reach the summit of the Cho Oyu.

Mt. Dhaulagiri- 8,167 meters (26,795 feet)

dhaulagiri

Mt. Dhaulagiri is another incredible climbing prospect in the easiest 8000m peak to climb in Nepal. Although scaling the 8,000-meter class is not an easy task due to the extreme altitude gain and presence of the death zone, the Dhaulagiri Expedition is still among the relatively moderate mountain peaks. The lack of extreme technical sections on this mountain makes it one of the easier climbable peaks; however, the Himalayan peak is exposed and steep. The Dhaulagiri Advanced Base Camp is situated at an altitude of 4,784 meters (15,577 feet); you will have to climb across the Eiger, a notorious rock tower that separates the North Face of the mountain from the Northeast spur.

Your climb up the icefall starts at the foot of Eiger and goes between the saddle of Dhaulagiri and Tukuche Ri as you head toward Camp I at an altitude of 5,450 meters (21,00 feet). You will have to traverse across the mixed section on this part; the first segment is known as the Jacbos Ladder, and you will climb across the 35°-40° slope to advance to Camp II (6,400 meters). The slopes up ahead from Camp II are of intermediate level and safer; climbing across the ice and snow section as well as the blue ice section of the 35°-40° slope, you will reach Camp III at an elevation of 7,400 meters (24,278 feet). You will then move forward with the help of a fixed rope on the sustained slope to head toward Camp IV at an altitude of 7,500 meters (24,606 feet).

During the summit push, you will climb on the central panel via the exposed ride and move along the 35° -50° slope across mostly snow and blue ice sections. The climbing section is not technical in the lower division; however, as you ascend across several basins and short snow headwalls, the climbing section starts to get trickier. You will climb past the False Summit and climb along the exposed ridge to the summit of Dhaulagiri.

Mt. Kanchenjunga- 8,586 meters (28,169 feet)

Kanchenjunga Expedition

Mt. Kanchenjunga is another fascinating peak in the Nepali Himalayas and was considered the tallest mountain in the world before Mt. Everest was officially recognized as the tallest peak in the world in 1865. This towering Himalayan peak in the far eastern Himalayas of Nepal is the second-highest peak in the country and the third-highest alpine peak in the 8,000-meters standing at an elevation of 8,586 meters (28,169 feet). Similar to Everest Expedition, going in order for the easiest 8000m peak to climb in Nepal, the Kanchenjunga Expedition is the next best alternative to extend the Himalayan prospects. The Advanced Kanchenjunga Base Camp is situated at an altitude of 5,400 meters (17,717 feet), to reach the base camp, you will need to traverse across the most remote and isolated part of the country.

Your expedition from the base camp starts ascending over the Yalung Glacier across the blended terrain of rock and ice segments. You will climb the steep slopes as well as a serac to the snow edge and the crampon point to reach Camp I on the mountain, which is at an elevation of 6,200 meters (20,341 feet). The climbing route further ahead passes through the intermediate technical section from the south face of the Yalung Glacier. You will traverse a short horizontal ridge to cross a plateau and then head toward the section of the ice sheet. Although you will not need a ladder, you will use the fixed rope to climb on a 35°-35° slope to reach Camp II at an altitude of 6,400 meters (2,099 feet). The climbing distance from Camp II to Camp III, which is situated at 7,100 meters (23,294 feet), is the longest distance of the expedition; you will traverse across a large serac base about 20 meters high, and the route is exposed to cold wind.

The climbing distance from Camp III to Camp IV is much shorter, and you will climb across the route with seracs and precipices heading toward the base of the prominent Coulour. You will scale your way on the 50°-555° slope across the ice and snow section to reach Camp IV, situated at an elevation of 7,550 meters (24,770 feet). During the summit push part, you will climb up the Couloir to upto an altitude of 8,250 meters; then, the Couloir is divided into two parts. You will take the path toward the right and head toward the base of a lofty divider at 8,400 meters, and you will cross an ice wall to reach the rocky tower at 8,450 meters. During the last part, you will cross Chimmney at 8,500 meters and join the snow slant to reach the summit of Kanchenjunga.

Get Insights On:

Mt. Annapurna- 8,091 meters (26,545 feet)

Mt. Annapurna- 8,091 meters (26,545 feet)

Mt. Annapurna, located in the north-central part of the Nepali Himalayas, is the 10th highest peak in the 8,000-meter class. Mt. Annapurna is the lowest peak 8,000-meter peak in Nepal; the expedition to this incredible Himalayan peak is considered a technical climb. This Himalayan peak is also considered a sacred peak by the natives; its name ‘Annapurna’ can be translated to ‘Full of Food,’ this holy peak is also referred to as ‘Goddess of Harvest’ as it nourishes the valley around. The Annapurna Advanced Base Camp is located at an altitude of 4,200 meters (13,780 feet), and your scaling of the mountain begins from the southwest ridge. After properly acclimatizing at the base camp, you will traverse your way across the mixed terrains consisting of ridge rock and glacier on the slope of 25°. The climbing route is slightly technical, and you will use the fixed rope to head toward Camp I, situated at an altitude of 5,200 meters (17,060 feet).

The segment between Camp I and Camp II at an altitude of 6,500 meters (21,325 feet) has an intermediate ice section and some mixed climbing sections. This climbing route is safer and more comfortable; however, you will still need to cross the black rock wall before making your way up the glacier. You will then climb across the 45° blue ice segment heading toward Camp III. The scaling segment between Camp II and Camp III, which is at an elevation of 6,500 meters (21,325 feet), is considered to be the longest part of this climb; you will cross the glacier from east to west and climb across a 55° wall about 500 meters in distance with the help of fixed rope. From Camp III, you will move along the plateau across the crevasses and seracs toward the couloir; you will climb on the 50°-55° slope heading toward Camp IV, situated at an elevation of 7,100 meters (23,294 feet).

On the summit push day, you will climb with the help of a fixed rope about 900 meters above Camp IV and below the highest point. Most sections in this final stretch are blue ice and snow; the climbing part is not technical during the early part, and you will pass across basins and short snow headwalls. Right below the central panel, there is a false summit; you will climb past the false summit and finish at the summit of the exposed ridge.






    avatar

    Prakash Devkota

    Managing Director and Team Leader

    Mr. Prakash Chandra Devkota is a well-known entrepreneur with a deep-rooted passion for elevating the tourism industry in Nepal. Due to his dedication, hard work, and hospitable nature, he has established himself as a successful businessman. He also has a great enthusiasm for adventure and social work.

    Mr. Devkota hails from the beautiful hilly region of Gorkha District. He started his career as a guide in 1997 and quickly became a reputed figure in the Tourism Industry because of his extensive experience. He has gathered impressive experience in all Trekking and Climbing Routes, such as Mera, Island, Lobuche, Ama Dablam etc.

    His success also lies in his brilliant mind and hospitable nature. He is fully dedicated to providing excellent services and introducing innovative concepts. With more than 15 years of experience in trekking and expedition operations in Nepal, Tibet, India, and Bhutan, he has earned a reputation as a renowned leader in the field. He understands the importance of personalized service for creating memorable experiences for his clients and constantly seeks innovative company operation methods. He strongly believes in the power of the tourism industry and is confident that its development can empower the youth and help the economy flourish in the long run.

    ×